We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day Three

The dama gazelle (Nanger dama) also known as the “addra gazelle” or “mhorr gazelle”, is a species of gazelle. It lives in Africa, in the Sahara desert and Sahel region. The critically endangered dama gazelle is also one of the rarest. Fewer than 400 individuals remain in the wild, mainly in Chad and Sudan. Addra are considered the largest type of gazelle, with incredibly long legs and both males and females have horns. They curve back and up, but reach a length of only about 17 inches with males having 18 to 23 distinct rings and smooth tips.

If you want to join in either daily, weekly or just on the odd occasion then please visit Becky, the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day Two

The spotted-necked otter or speckle-throated otter lives throughout sub-Sahara countries from Guinea Bissau to south-west Ethiopia and in the south eastern South Africa. The Latin name Hydrictis maculicollis breaks down to water (hydro) spotted (macula) neck (collis). The uniquely patterned spots on their chests are dappled with cream-colored or white patches, contrasting their brown to red fur. The average length of a spotted-necked otter is about 2.5 feet, and they typically weigh between 7-13 pounds, with the males being slightly larger. They have long, flattened tails and are highly flexible, easily able to touch their tails with their noses. They can live alone or in large social groups.

If you want to join in either daily, weekly or just on the odd occasion then please visit Becky, the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day One

Kirk’s Dik diks / Madoqua kirkii live alone, in pairs, or in small groups of between 3 and 10 individuals. Dik dik pairs choose a territory and may occupy and defend that same territory for life. They are among the smallest antelopes reaching just 40cm at shoulder height.

If you want to join in either daily, weekly or just on the odd occasion then please visit Becky, the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉