Flashback Friday #4

In January 2017 I wrote several posts about the amazing Sagrada Familia which I visited with my daughter on a mother/daughter holiday to Barcelona in October 2016. A most wonderful trip even if it was quite exhausting!

On 11 July 2010, the Sagrada Familia was consecrated by Pope Benedict XVI and elevated to the status of a basilica. It is not, as some assume, a cathedral as it is without a bishop’s headquarters. But the huge dimensions of the interior is worthy of that status.

Stepping inside the Basílica i Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família is like stepping into an enchanted forest. Tall trees towering above us; their branches creating a canopy. The streams of coloured light; the verticality and the enormous, seemingly empty space takes your breath away. At first I didn’t know what to look at, where to begin the tour, what to focus my camera on. Double-storey height windows flood the space with a light never before seen within a church.

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The nave is a sight to behold. A work of mathematical genius with natural light flooding in through clear glass leaded panels to allow as much light in as possible.

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The columns are modelled after a forest and form a light canopy of palm leaves.

ceiling

I’m not going to go into all the symbolism of the basilica, you can find that out for yourself, instead I shall just let you have a look at some of the bits that caught my eye and where I could actually get a shot without dozens of people in the way. Continue reading Flashback Friday #4

Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

This month we are looking at Brown. The colour of Mother Earth.

They call Dungeness the desert of England, though experts observe that, lacking both the dearth of water and the extreme differential in night and day temperatures, it fulfils none of the desert criteria.

It is certainly a uniquely beautiful site where you can capture some intriguing photographs with its lighthouses, abandoned fishing boats, wooden cabins and thriving wildlife.What browns can you find in your world?

Friday Flashback #3

Here’s a post I wrote on 15 January 2015 shortly before the birth of my youngest granddaughter.  Sadly I have not yet been able to visit to meet her brother who was born in August 2020.

A quick weekend visit to Wiltshire to visit family gave me the opportunity to finally revisit Stonehenge after many, many years. I was one of the fortunate people who was able to run around the stones back in the 1960s. Since 1978 the stones have been fenced off and the experience of viewing them through wire did not appeal to me, even though I have passed the site often on my way to the South-West.

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The whole site has been much improved by the removal of the old A344, a major road that ran up the north edge of the stones. You now approach from the west, either on foot or using the shuttle bus, and make your way clockwise around the monument which allows you to see all the stones above ground.

north view

What you see probably originates from around 2500 BC and took 800 years to build. Obviously the site has changed over the centuries, but it seems that the larger sarsen stones were constructed then and do not appear to have been moved, whereas the smaller bluestones may have been rearranged several times. Continue reading Friday Flashback #3

Life in Colour

A bonus brown this week as I spotted this on my Sunday walk.

On returning home and reading through the posts in my Reader I realised that these two photos were also perfect for another challenge, though these were not taken using my macro lens, but my phone camera.

There is something inherently beautiful about a skeleton leaf
or in this case, petal.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #130 |it’s a small world