October Squares

The October theme offers something for absolutely everybody – a chance to share past posts, past squares and glimpses of the past. I’m going to mix it up a bit, with photos that have appeared in previous Square challenges, some that didn’t make the final and some new photos that would have done. Day 18

Sign from the past – October 2021

If you want to join in either daily, weekly or just on the odd occasion then please visit Becky, the only rule is that the photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

October Squares

The October theme offers something for absolutely everybody – a chance to share past posts, past squares and glimpses of the past. I’m going to mix it up a bit, with photos that have appeared in previous Square challenges, some that didn’t make the final and some new photos that would have done. Day 17

Flowers – September 2017 / Pink – September 2018 / Kinda Soft – october 2020

If you want to join in either daily, weekly or just on the odd occasion then please visit Becky, the only rule is that the photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

This week I am going to look at transport, including another of those wonderful streetcars from San Francisco. But we’ll begin with this lovely traditional Maltese bus.  The old Malta buses were really something truly unique and one of the most recognisable icons of Malta. The last of these old Maltese buses were yellow in colour with an orange horizontal stripe and their Gozitan counterparts grey coloured with a red horizontal stripe. The vast majority of the buses started and ended their trips at the main terminus in Valletta with a few operating on circular routes. Sadly these were phased out in 2011.

A Maltese Bus

Milan, Italy 1856, built in 1928 and still operational. The second most common type of streetcar in Muni’s historic fleet is an American classic with an Italian accent. This type of car is named for Cleveland street railway commissioner Peter Witt, who designed it for his Ohio city around 1915. The concept was to speed loading by putting the conductor in the middle of the car, letting crowds board through the front door and paying as they passed the conductor. The design was also exported to world cities such as Toronto, Mexico City, Madrid, and three Italian cities, Naples, Turin, and Milan where they still operate today.

(In the 1970s, the Milan tram fleet was repainted a solid orange, the livery worn by the remainder of Muni’s Milan trams)

If you want to learn more about San Francisco’s historic streetcars and cable cars then please visit the Market Street Railway Museum.

Do you have any orange Transport?

October Squares

The October theme offers something for absolutely everybody – a chance to share past posts, past squares and glimpses of the past. I’m going to mix it up a bit, with photos that have appeared in previous Square challenges, some that didn’t make the final and some new photos that would have done. Day 16

Lines – october 2019 / Perspective July 2020

If you want to join in either daily, weekly or just on the odd occasion then please visit Becky, the only rule is that the photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

Flashback Friday #42

Back in the old days the OH and I used to try and take a short UK break around our birthdays, which worked very well as we then had a holiday in late spring (May) and one in early autumn (October). This one was my choice for celebrating my birthday in 2014.


Just Back From… Dorset

A last minute booking to Bridport in Dorset for a birthday and wedding anniversary celebration was made in lieu of the proposed trip to Seattle. After a gorgeous sunny September, autumn also decided to come along too, so it was a mixed week of sunshine and showers and even a few dramatic thunderstorms with lightning and thundering waves.

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Bridport

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Bridport is a quaint market town in West Dorset and only a mile from the famous Jurassic coast at West Bay with its lovely harbour and shingle beach. It has an open and airy feel to it because of the wide streets that contain several hundred listed buildings many of them built to accommodate the twisting and dyeing of ropes and nets during the late 12th century. It also has a lively arts and literary scene.

Although in a self-catering house I don’t consider it a holiday if I do all the cooking so we  ate take away fish and chips from Longs in West Street which were excellent – thin batter on the succulent cod and crisp chips. And the best deal was a thin crust pizza, salad and 1/2 pint of local cider from The Stable, behind the Bull hotel on East Street  – £10 on a Tuesday. If you like it hot go for the Blaster! Or what about the Bucky Doo?

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The Hive Beach Café
The Hive Beach Café

Good fish and seafood can be found in local pubs and restaurants, but head to the Hive Beach Café, a tarpaulin-sided hut which is a popular place for lunch as it is right on the beach at Burton Bradstock, 4 miles from Bridport along the shingle Chesil Beach. It is very busy at the weekend, even at this time of year, but worth the wait (no bookings) for the fresh lobster, sea bass or grilled sardines. An obvious choice for Saturday’s birthday lunch.

West Bay

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Only a mile from Bridport is West Bay with its newly designed harbour, vertical sandstone cliff glowing like molten gold in the late afternoon sun and sweeping shingle beach. West bay grew up as the harbour for nearby Bridport and was Thomas Hardy’s “Port Bredy”. More recently it was the location of the TV drama ‘Broadchurch’. Brightly coloured fishing boats bob in the harbour, fishermen line the harbour walls or the edge of the surf, and cute wooden shacks and kiosks line the harbour walk where you can buy fish and chips, fish stews, ice-creams. We stopped for dessert – a cone of delicious Purbeck fig and honey ice-cream.

Lyme Regis

The main attraction in Lyme is the historic medieval harbour known as The Cobb featured in the ‘French Lieutenant’s Woman’. Known as the gateway to the Dorset Jurassic Coast, Lyme Regis provides a good base for visiting walkers. The town has long inspired artistic and literary visitors including, Tolkien, Tennyson and Jane Austen who set the novel ‘Persuasion here. There are excellent facilities with plenty of restaurants, pubs and cafés as well as an interesting selection of galleries and shops to explore in the old town which dates from the 14th century.

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As always on my holidays there were trips to the coast and visits to gardens. Not a lot of chances to visit historical places at this time of year and with the nights closing in, the days are shorter, but we had a wonderful time and hope it won’t be decades before we return.

Burton Bradstock
Storm on the last day

This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.