Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

The Hastings Lifeboat Station is located at The Stade in Hastings Old Town – right next to the fishing fleet berths on the working beach. The new boathouse was built in 1995 to safely accommodate the Mersey class and D class lifeboats, along with tractor, bobcat and carriages. The station was also the first designated visitor centre for the RNLI, and now attracts over 60,000 visitors each year.

Do you Have any  blue Buildings?

Flashback Friday #30

Back in 2015 I used to take part regularly in a monthly challenge hosted by Dawn from ‘The Day After’ who invited participants to post pictures of any windows that  they find curious, inviting, photogenic, or in some way tell a story.


Painted Ladies of San Francisco

The “Painted Ladies” of San Francisco sounds quite scandalous, but is actually a nickname for the city’s Victorian and Edwardian mansions with their genteel pastel hues and feminine façades, lacy wooden mantles and perfectly pitched roofs.

Postcard Row

One of the most photographed vistas is from Alamo Square on the corner of Hays and Steiner where you get a background of the modern city that contrasts with these lovely ladies. It is sometimes known as “Postcard Row.” The houses were built between 1892 and 1896 by developer Matthew Kavanaugh, who lived next door in the 1892 mansion at 722 Steiner Street.  The definition of a painted lady is a Victorian with three or more paint colours. So, even though the seven on Steiner Street are the most famous — there are several other painted ladies in the neighbourhood to enjoy.

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Explore the streets, parks and vistas around Scott Street, McAllister, Haight Street, Steiner and Pierce that tell the story of a Victorian era and discover more beautiful mansions, but be warned, it is very hilly around here so it can be quite a strenuous walk. Alamo square is a great place to sit and rest and admire the view after your walk around the neighbourhood.

I walked about 10 blocks from the Misión San Francisco de Asís on 16th Street which is some distance away, through Duboce Park. You can of course take public transport to Alamo Square, but then you’d miss an awful lot of this wonderful architecture. And don’t forget to look up!

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This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.

Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

We are back in San Francisco this week with a another look at the Historic Streetcars, this time in blue.

San Francisco Municipal Railway (1940s), No.130, built in 1914, is currently awaiting restoration after 102 years of service with the original wiring. Car No. 130 was among the the last ‘Iron Monsters’ to leave passenger service. In 1958. Muni shop foreman Charlie Smallwood saved it from the scrap heap by hiding it in the back of Geneva carhouse while its mates met their fates.

Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company, No.1060, built in 1947. This streetcar is an actual Philadelphia streetcar painted in that city’s original PCC livery, dating from 1938, of silver with cream window area and electric blue striping. The similarity to the packaging of Kraft’s famous ‘Philadelphia Cream Cheese’ did not go unnoticed, providing the car a nickname — the Cream Cheese Car.

San Francisco Municipal Railway (1940s), No.1010, built 1948. This car is painted in tribute to the ‘Magic Carpets’, as Muni’s first five modern-design streetcars were known.

If you want to learn more about San Francisco’s historic streetcars and cable cars then please visit the Market Street Railway Museum.

Can you find any blue transport?

Flashback Friday #29

Older bloggers may remember a time when WordPress used to run a weekly photography challenge which many of us enjoyed. It was a great way to share photos and exchange comments and I am sure a lot of us made many blogging friends that way. Sadly it all came to an end on 31st May 2018. This was originally posted in 2016 when I was delighted to get my camera back from repair.


WPC: Detail

“Those bloggers who follow me on my flower blog will know that I am very fond of capturing the components in nature – last year I finally bought a camera with interchangeable lenses purely so that I could indulge in a macro lens. One that captures the tiniest details which I have used mainly for flower macros.

So this week’s photo challenge is right up my street. Literally!”

(please click on an image to enlarge and see the full extent of the details)

Rusty bolt

Do you ever really see the characteristics of a rusty item?

String caught in barbed wire

Or the way a fragment of fabric gets entangled in barbed wire?

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Or how skilfully the craftsman edged his roof? Nature provides the lichens. When you look closely that’s when you notice those little, important, details.


This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.