World Photography Day

World Photography Day is an annual, worldwide celebration of the art, craft, science and history of photography.  And this year it is the 19th August.

Lacock Abbey

I thought I’d share some photos of Lacock Abbey once home to William Henry Fox Talbot, polymath and pioneer of Victorian photography, who moved to Lacock Abbey in 1827 and created the earliest surviving photographic negative in 1835, taken of a small window in the Abbey’s South Gallery. Not much bigger than a stamp!

When we visited in late May only part of the building was open, including the north cloisters. I do like a cloister though this one is quite small and the light was challenging.

Flashback Friday #28

This post was originally posted for the WordPress weekly Photo Challenge about symbols back in 2015


The Wars of the Roses

As a child growing up in West Yorkshire I knew that a friendly rivalry existed between Yorkshire and Lancashire, our neighbours on the other side of the Pennines. Later on at grammar school I learnt a little about the Wars of the Roses and was astonished to discover that it wasn’t a war between the two counties as I had believed, but a series of battles fought in medieval England from 1455 to 1485 between the House of Lancaster and the House of York.

The name of the battles derives from the symbols used by the two sides:

comtesse d'Oxford
Red Rose  – House of Lancaster
House of York
White Rose – House of York

On moving to Ludlow a few years ago I found out that one of the major battles of these wars took place only a few hundred yards from where I now live. The Battle of Ludford Bridge 12 October 1459. The Yorkist factions gathered here to make a push into Worcestershire, but fell back when they encountered a large group of Lancastrians led by Henry VI. The two sides took up positions on the opposite banks of the River Teme, but many of the Yorkists deserted during the night and the rest retreated the next day. So a victory for the Lancastrians. It is such a picturesque spot now that it is hard to imagine a battle taking place here.


This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.

Life in Colour

A bonus Salmon Pink.

Pinkish bricks of the Maws building in Shropshire

The Maws Craft Centre and Maws Creative Spaces are a collection of art, craft and design studios situated in the picturesque Ironbridge Gorge, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, 1.5 miles from the historic Iron Bridge. Housed in the refurbished Victorian tile factory of Maw & Co, once the world’s largest tile manufacturer. The building now comprises independently run studios – a mix of artists, designers & makers, galleries, a holistic therapist, a plant shop, the Tile Press café a craft supplies shop, the Gorge Parish Council office, IT consultants and media companies.

Can you find any pink architecture?

Flashback Friday #9

Lincoln Cathedral: Choir Screen was written in February 2017 – one of several posts about this lovely cathedral which we visited in 2016 on a road journey up the east coast of England culminating in Scotland.


The †13C limestone choir screen is a marvellous example of decorated Gothic architecture with pinnacles and arches with tiny carved animal heads.

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choirscreen-2

The walls of the screen are covered with carvings of leaves and flowers. Traces of red and blue paint can still be seen on them.

Carved head of a tongue-puller journeyman in his leather cap.

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I only wish I lived closer as I could spend many an hour focussing on the details of this screen.


This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.

Flashback Friday #5

This is a bit of a cheat as the original post wasn’t written on this date, but in April 2017, however several people expressed a desire to have another look around this beautiful site in Barcelona so I hope Fandango doesn’t mind. The April date coincided with another post I wanted to return to.


This breathtakingly beautiful site is full of wonderful mosaics, colours, sculptures, windows, artistic design and architectural details from the modernist era.

First I will show you the map of the site again so you can see where the pavilions are situated and then we’ll take a stroll around the site.

View from the Administration Pavilion (Building A on the map) looking at the Operations building (B) in the centre

After going through the entrance gate with our pre-booked tickets we found ourselves following the underground tunnel which brought us out just in front of the Casa D’Operacions (Sant Cosme and Sant Damia). For what felt like an eternity both my daughter and I were stunned into silence as we gazed around us.  From the front we were already in awe of the craftsmanship we had seen, but we didn’t expect such beauty to continue so meticulously.

Continue reading Flashback Friday #5