Sant Pau Art Nouveau Site: Nostra Senyora del Carme (5)

When you first enter the site and see these wonderful restored buildings you may think they are all the same. Look carefully at the roofs and the windows as they are of different styles and patterns. Some windows still have the original shutters.

The most prominent figure-symbol is the guardian angel, who may appear in the guise of a man, woman or child. Examine each of the statues on the pavilions as they have such angels guarding them.

And each of the water towers has the same decorative floral ceramic tiles at its base. But look at the upper ring of tiles and you will notice they are all different. The small domed roofs follow the same pattern: a main copper-coloured body of monochrome tiles closed off by three upper rings that converge on the stone lantern.


Source: All the information in these Sant Pau posts is taken from the admission booklet. 

How to get there:
Metro: L5 Sant Pau / Dos de Maig or L2 to Sagrada Familia and walk up Avenue de Gaudi
Bus: H8, 19, 20, 45, 47, 50, 51, 92, 117, 192

Sant Pau Art Nouveau Site: Nostra Senyora de la Mercè (7)

This pavilion dates from 1905 – 1912 and was used for Maternity, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

After over eighty years as the site of the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau the Art Nouveau site has been transformed into a research centre with international organisations from Healthcare, Sustainability and Education. At present there are seven institutions housed on this complex. Lucky workers!


Source: All the information in these Sant Pau posts is taken from the admission booklet. 

How to get there:
Metro: L5 Sant Pau / Dos de Maig or L2 to Sagrada Familia and walk up Avenue de Gaudi
Bus: H8, 19, 20, 45, 47, 50, 51, 92, 117, 192

Sant Pau Art Nouveau Site: Nostra Senyora de Montserrat (9)

The second of the two larger buildings to be restored was built between 1905 and 1912. The original use was for General Surgery for females.

The presence of stone sculpture is very important throughout the site. Capitals, floral details, corbels and structures all designed by the architect himself complete the varied decoration of the complex. Details such as delicate flowers embedded in the brick walls, niches, floral crowns on the capitals – each one different, despite their apparent uniformity – and reliefs on ventilation shafts are a sample of the varied work of the stonemasons.

The details are superb. All the shrines, angels, heads of angels and gargoyles in the form of animals on the complex were the work of Gargallo.


Source: All the information in these Sant Pau posts is taken from the admission booklet. 

How to get there:
Metro: L5 Sant Pau / Dos de Maig or L2 to Sagrada Familia and walk up Avenue de Gaudi
Bus: H8, 19, 20, 45, 47, 50, 51, 92, 117, 192

Black and White Sunday: Traces of the Past

Continuing with my Barcelona posts, I couldn’t help but notice this rather grand house in the Pedralbes district, up by the monastery. Obviously from the Modernista period, with ornate iron-work, coloured tiling, a roof terrace with a pretty stone balustrade and windows picked out in contrasting brickwork. It is however, sadly derelict with balconies rusting and floorless, graceful windows with broken shutters and bricked up openings, which keeps the house secure from squatters and seems to be the norm on mainland Europe, whereas we simply board them up.

Fancy Window Grills and bricked up windows

A grand house once (or maybe two apartments) I hope that one day whatever is preventing its sale or restoration is resolved as it would be a shame for it to deteriorate further, and one only has to imagine what beauties possibly lie inside.

Please visit Paula to see other representations of this week’s challenge.

Sant Pau Art Nouveau Site: Sant Manuel (10)

Sant Manuel is one of the taller buildings at the rear of the site and was built between 1923 and 1924. It was used as General Surgery for males.

Due to the two floors there are two sets of floor to ceiling windows in the circular rooms.

The small domes surmounting the water towers – the highest part of the pavilions – are also clad in monochrome tiles that follow the same pattern.