Narrow

the Fernery of Auckland, New Zealand

In the heart of the city of Auckland, New Zealand you will find the Auckland Domain which includes the Wintergardens. Two beautiful Victorian-style glasshouses with a central courtyard and sunken pool. One of the glasshouses is a cooler climate, allowing seasonal changes, while the other is heated to a tropical climate. Just off the left side of the central courtyard lies the entrance to the Fernery an underground place full of light and shadows, large tree-ferns to delicate maidenhair micro plants. Once inside you feel as though you have entered a prehistoric forest full of arching and dancing fronds and the smell of damp earth.

New Zealand has 194 native species and 35 introduced species of ferns and lycophytes. They range from freshwater to alpine habitats, and from just a few millimetres long to 20-metre-tall tree ferns. Just under half of the native species cannot be found anywhere else.

narrow (adjective) – of small width in relation to length

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #84 | Narrow

2020 Photo Challenge #7

February’s theme / technique: Being Creative with Patterns

The six visual keys to a great photograph are:

    • Patterns
    • Texture
    • Lines
    • Light
    • Depth of field

This month we are going to look at Patterns. Patterns can be found everywhere, in nature or man-made constructions. For a photographer, using patterns is key to a good composition.

They are made up of repeated objects, geometric shapes or abstract patterns, or colours and they may be random or ordered. Visual patterns in nature are often loose and organic – think of spirals, waves, rock formations, sand.

    • Try using patterns as the main subject of your photo with the focal point on the patterns removing the context.
    • Or you can use the pattern as a backdrop to something else.
    • Try abstract imagery using close-up photography – peeling paint, rust stains for example
    • Break the pattern, for instance position one red apple in the midst of a pile of green ones. And of course remembering the rule of thirds, any break should be on an intersection.
    • Create your own patterns.
    • Combine patterns. Contrasting or complementary patterns work well.
This week's assignment is a bit more difficult – Break the pattern, disrupt the continuity in some way

Continue reading 2020 Photo Challenge #7

2020 Photo Challenge #6

February’s theme / technique: Being Creative with Patterns

The six visual keys to a great photograph are:

    • Patterns
    • Texture
    • Lines
    • Light
    • Depth of field
    • Space

This month we are going to look at Patterns. Patterns can be found everywhere, in nature or man-made constructions. For a photographer, using patterns is key to a good composition.

They are made up of repeated objects, geometric shapes or abstract patterns, or colours and they may be random or ordered. Visual patterns in nature are often loose and organic – think of spirals, waves, rock formations, sand.

    • Try using patterns as the main subject of your photo with the focal point on the patterns removing the context.
    • Or you can use the pattern as a backdrop to something else.
    • Try abstract imagery using close-up photography – peeling paint, rust stains for example
    • Break the pattern, for instance position one red apple in the midst of a pile of green ones. And of course remembering the rule of thirds, any break should be on an intersection.
    • Create your own patterns.
    • Combine patterns. Contrasting or complementary patterns work well.
This week's assignment – Shoot from a different perspective. Look up, look down or shoot from a distance.

Continue reading 2020 Photo Challenge #6

2020 Photo Challenge #5

February’s theme / technique: Being Creative with Patterns

If you want to see what this month’s assignments are in advance then please click here. All the assignments are available from the menu on the left under the 2020 Photo Challenge / Assignments.

The six visual keys to a great photograph are:

    • Patterns
    • Texture
    • Lines
    • Light
    • Depth of field
    • Space

This month we are going to look at Patterns. Patterns can be found everywhere, in nature or man-made constructions. For a photographer, using patterns is key to a good composition.

They are made up of repeated objects, geometric shapes or abstract patterns, or colours and they may be random or ordered. Visual patterns in nature are often loose and organic – think of spirals, waves, rock formations, sand.

    • Try using patterns as the main subject of your photo with the focal point on the patterns removing the context.
    • Or you can use the pattern as a backdrop to something else.
    • Try abstract imagery using close-up photography – peeling paint, rust stains for example
    • Break the pattern, for instance position one red apple in the midst of a pile of green ones. And of course remembering the rule of thirds, any break should be on an intersection.
    • Create your own patterns.
    • Combine patterns. Contrasting or complementary patterns work well.
This week's assignment – look for various types of patterns - squares, circles, triangles and so on.

When you find an interesting example take several shots, shifting your camera position slightly between each one. Examine your pictures carefully to see which one produces the best result. It may not be the one you expected.

Continue reading 2020 Photo Challenge #5

Seeing Red

the National Museum of Australia, Canberra

This photo was taken of my son and eldest granddaughter just over five years ago when I visited her home town of Canberra. We spent the day visiting several of the capital city’s many free museums and galleries of which this was a favourite of mine. I found it particularly amusing that Miki was wearing a T-shirt with the logo “Offspring” on it. And had red hair at the time!

(This could also be a bonus square for Becky – Slatted-light or filtered-light be OK?)

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #81 | Red