2020 Photo Challenge #2

January’s theme / technique: Composition and Framing

Composition and Framing is dictated by the camera and lens equipment as well as where you can and cannot stand whilst viewing the subject. Challenge yourself by using a prime lens or not using the zoom on your lens on your lens so you have to physically move to take the shot. Often the more creative images come about from taking the time to move around a subject. We’ll explore some of these techniques over the coming months, but for now consider these tips:.

    1. Horizontal vs vertical – which looks better? Why?
    2. Missing parts of people or objects irritate the viewer and create an incomplete image. It distracts the eye. So watch the edges of your image.
    3. Rule of thirds
    4. Look for frames – These come in two types, natural or man-made. Natural would be an opening in trees or a rock formation with a hole in it. Man-made frames are doorways, windows or arches. All of these help contain the subject or scene in a form that is very pleasing to the eye.
    5. Watch your background. Make sure that there is nothing there that would detract from your subject. Things like chimneys or lamp-posts growing out of heads and other subjects diverting the eye from the main subject. You want balance by not going in too close but including enough of the environment of the subject or object to contextualise it.
This week's assignment - Move in closer to your subject, but not too close. Lead the viewer towards the subject.

Continue reading 2020 Photo Challenge #2

2020 Photo Challenge #1

Once upon a time I ran a challenge for those of us who love photographing benches (2015) and although some fellow bloggers have suggested running that challenge again, I think benches have had their time in the spotlight. However, I have been thinking of ways to challenge myself (and possibly you) this year and decided to challenge myself by trying out various photographic techniques, skills or concepts. If you would like to join in then I have a 2020 Photo Challenge page set up to explain the simple guidelines and proposed monthly assignments.

January’s theme / technique: Composition and Framing

Composition and Framing is dictated by the camera and lens equipment as well as where you can and cannot stand whilst viewing the subject. Challenge yourself by using a prime lens or not using the zoom on your lens so you have to physically move to take the shot. Often the more creative images come about from taking the time to move around a subject. We’ll explore some of these techniques over the coming months, but for now consider these tips:

    1. Horizontal vs vertical – which looks better? Why?
    2. Missing parts of people or objects irritate the viewer and create an incomplete image. It distracts the eye. So watch the edges of your image.
    3. Rule of thirds
    4. Look for frames – These come in two types, natural or man-made. Natural would be an opening in trees or a rock formation with a hole in it. Man-made frames are doorways, windows or arches. All of these help contain the subject or scene in a form that is very pleasing to the eye.
    5. Watch your background. Make sure that there is nothing there that would detract from your subject. Things like chimneys or lamp-posts growing out of heads and other subjects diverting the eye from the main subject. You want balance by not going in too close but including enough of the environment of the subject or object to contextualise it.
This week's assignment - clearly identify your subject. Begin by explaining your choice. How will you draw attention to it?

I am going to use the same subject throughout this month, but you don’t need to. Each assignment will look at different ways of arranging the subject elements and to recognise the key ingredients of a scene.

Continue reading 2020 Photo Challenge #1

October Squares Review

Becky (the Queen of Squares) challenged us to find lines in October. In Squares naturally. Any lines.

“Your lines can be long, short, straight or curvy. They might be horizontal, vertical, diagonal, perpendicular or even zig zag. You might prefer them intersecting, natural, singular or in stripes.”

lines

Line 1: Floor in Sydney’s Customs House Library; Telegraph poles along the dunes in Phillack/Hayle; Bird cage art installation, Sydney; Haymaking field and cabbage lines in Godrevy.

Line 2: A stripy cat; Office building in Sydney; Infinity Blue sculpture at the Eden Project in Cornwall; Bicycle railings at Godrevy.

Line 3: Herring-bone paved walkway in Auckland’s harbour area; A line of beach huts at Herne Bay, Kent; Fencing on Godrevy; Groynes and a disconnected pier at Herne Bay.

Line 4: Countryside lines in South Devon; DNA lines on the Globe installation, San Diego; Roof lines of the British Museum in London; Fishing lines on the pier in Herne Bay.

Line 1: Electricity power lines along the dunes in Phillack/Hayle; Lines of words (dictionary) from an art installation at the Customs House Library in Sydney; A Widow’s Walk in West Bay, Dorset; Zig-zag flooring in the Queen Victoria Building (the QVB) in Sydney.

Line 2: Multiple reflectons of the Sydney Opera House; lines of poetry created by me using the Erasure technique; waves on the River Hayle (Heyl); Solarised effect on banana leaves.

Line 3: Tramlines on Auckland’s quay; Shadow and paving at West Bay, Dorset with some cryptic words; the train line from London to Portsmouth on a very snowy day in 2010 when all the trains stopped running; another globe featuring the decline of the polar bear habitat.

Line 4: Lines of Longitude and Latitude encouraging the use of tall grass to help with climate change; lines drawn in the sand by the RNLI coastguards at Gwithian sands in Cornwall; wavy pavement designs (calçada portuguesa) typically found in Portuguese towns and cities – this one in Cascais; V-line formation of Brent Geese heading to their roost after feeding on the Hayle estuary.

Many thanks to Becky for hosting this lovely challenge. Her followers have increased this month due to the wide ranging nature of the concept of lines. Once you start looking around you you realise that you are surrounded by lines. Man-made and natural. Literal or metaphorical. This is a theme that could last an eternity. If you have missed any of the wonderful entries then you could allow yourself a few hours to browse the clever selections that Becky creates during the challenge which is an immense task and for which I thank her.

Oh, and does anyone know which of my ‘lines’ in the collages is the bonus one?

October Squares | Day Thirty-One

This is the last in the month that Becky (the Queen of Squares) has challenged us to find lines. In Squares naturally. I’m finishing with several poignant lines that I hope you will like.

Visiting time

October Squares | Day 31

Many thanks Becky for hosting yet another wonderful and inspiring challenge: you always get me to see the world around me differently. A review of this month’s squares will appear in a couple of days – meanwhile I hope you have a well deserved rest!

The words in this poem have been selected using a technique known as Erasure. I’ll let Cathy (~wander.essence~) explain it.

This type of Found Poem is known as Erasure, where you choose a source and erase away most of the “text” and leave words and/or phrases and/or sentences so that what’s left says something very different from what the original writing said and is art.  The end result should be something different from what the original text said.

Mine came from a page in a novel I was recently reading and I just thought I’d give it a go. The end result is not so different than the original text, but these words caught my imagination. I’ll leave it to you, the reader, to form your own story.

~wander.essence~ poetry

October Squares | Day Thirty

This month Becky (the Queen of Squares) has challenged us to find lines. In Squares naturally. That is the only proper ‘rule’. I have been dipping into the archives for this one, as well as finding local lines.

moving lines

These slow moving waves on the Hayle river were caused by a small fishing vessel that had left the quay in front of me. I was capturing the lines of the viaduct and boat masts for the challenge, but then this caught my eye. I hope it captures the feeling of the swell moving along.

This is the penultimate square lines – still time to post if you want to join in!

October Squares | Day 30