We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day 27

Not the prettiest of my zoo animals, this wild pig is native to the Philippines, but not much is known about Visayan warty pigs in the wilderness. The boars grow stiff, spiky “hairdos” as mating season approaches. The piglets are quite cute and striped, but lose their side stripes as they get older. The Visayan Warty Pig retains one white stripe across its nose. I wouldn’t want to bump into this particular beast in the woods!

One thing you might not know about pigs/hogs: If a porcine individual’s tail is curly, then he or she is domesticated; wild pigs have straight tails.

We have reached the penultimate day of the ODD SQUARES month with Becky and the Square gang, so hurry up and get your post(s) in; the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day 26

The four types of tapir are most closely related to horses and rhinos, since they have an odd number of toes (four toes on each front foot, three on each back foot). Their eyes and ears are small, and the body is teardrop shaped. The tapir’s nose and upper lip combine into a flexible snout like an elephant’s trunk. It can be used as a snorkel when the tapir is underwater and as an effective tool to detect odours wafting through the dense forest.

Only two more days left to join in with the ODD SQUARES month with Becky and the Square gang, so hurry up and get your post(s) in; the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day 25

A “kat” is not a “cat” when it’s a meerkat, a vital, clever, and amazing weasel-like animal that is a member of the mongoose family. Meerkats have scent pouches below their tails and rub these pouches on rocks and plants to mark their territory. The territories of different meerkat mobs often overlap, resulting in constant disputes. Usually, a lot of aggressive posturing and bluffing precedes any physical contact. (Remind you of anyone?)

Meerkats have developed a way to forage in relative safety: adults take turns acting as guard while the others can look for food without worries. The guard climbs to the highest rock, termite mound, or bush he or she can find, stands upright on two legs, and then announces the beginning of guard duty with a specialized call. It makes a low, constant peeping, known as the “watchman’s song,” when all is well.

Only three more days left to join in with the ODD SQUARES month with Becky and the Square gang, so hurry up and get your post(s) in; the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day 24

Lesser kudu are striking striped antelope native to the dry lands of north-eastern Africa. Male and female lesser kudu look very different. Males are pale grey, and females are a bright reddish-brown. Both sexes have white stripes on their bodies. Only males have impressive spiralled horns which will twist 2.5 times and can grow up to 3.5 feet (60 to105 cm) long.

Large ears allow for enhanced listening abilities and predator detection. Facial markings consist of black stripes running from each eye towards the nose, and a white stripe running from each eye to the centre of the face. Legs are fawn coloured, with white spots above the hooves. Two white spots adorn either side of the neck. Lesser kudu are great jumpers and can leap over obstacles up to 8 feet (2.5 metres) high.

Lesser kudu emit a bark vocalisation when startled which warns others of potential predators.

We are into the last week of the ODD SQUARES month so please join in with Becky and the Square gang; the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day 23

The okapi (pronounced oh-KAHP-ee) is beautiful and unusual. With its white-and-black striped hindquarters and front legs, it looks like it must be related to zebras! But take a look at an okapi’s head, and you’ll notice a resemblance to giraffes. The okapi is indeed the only living relative of the giraffe.

The okapi’s home is in the tropical rainforest in the northeast region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire), in Central Africa which is the reason it is not as tall as a giraffe. Being really tall is not a good idea in a forest!

The zebra-like stripes offer great camouflage when an okapi stands in the partial sunlight that filters through its dense rainforest habitat. The stripes may also help a young okapi follow its mother through the dark forest.

We are into the last week of the ODD SQUARES month so please join in with Becky and the Square gang; the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉