Five Photos, Five Stories: Day 2

I’ve been invited to take part in the “Five Photos, Five Stories” challenge by Alison of Scene by Minerva. The challenge is quite simply to “post a photo each day for five consecutive days and attach a story to the photo. It can be fiction or non-fiction, a poem or a short paragraph and each day nominate another blogger for the challenge”.

My five photos are going to depict what I love about Cornwall. The light, the colours, the coast, the history.

Wheal Coates
The Towanroath pumping engine house at Wheal Coates Copper and Tin Mine

The miners dug deep
Searching for copper and tin
On Cornwall’s rich coast

(please click image to enlarge)

My nomination today is Carol of The Eternal Traveller who writes about her travels at home in Australia and beyond.  Absolutely no requirement to join in, only if you want to.

Published by

Heyjude

I have lived in the UK for most of my life, but when young I definitely had wanderlust and even ended up living in South Africa for several years which was a wonderful experience. I now look forward to a long and leisurely retirement doing what I like most - gardening, photography, walking and travelling.

50 thoughts on “Five Photos, Five Stories: Day 2”

    1. Thanks Adrian. If only I could take photos like you do!
      It is a tricky path, lots of loose stones. I really don’t like the sea and sky in this image, but it caught the drama of the mine being on the edge. I should spend a bit of time in Photoshop and try and improve it. 🙂

      1. It looked like a very difficult exposure to balance Jude. It’s often the case in situations like this one where to get the engine house properly exposed, the sky gets blown, it’s just too bright. Sadly, once the sky is blown (and this frequently happens with auto exposures especially) there’s nothing you can do to get the detail in the sky back. It’s simply not there. The best option in these circumstances is to take two pictures, one of the sky properly exposed and one of the subject properly exposed, and then blend them later in photoshop. There is even free exposure blending software out there that will do this for you automatically. The other ‘correct’ way would be to use a filter to darken the sky and allow you to get the shot in one take. I don’t see blending as a cheat, it’s a neat solution if you don’t have filters or don’t want to be carrying them.

        1. Thanks for the advice Adrian, it is greatly appreciated. I have used the bracketing feature on my camera where it takes 3 images at different exposures, but never really worked out how to blend them. I need to work on that aspect to improve the images.

    1. The paths are not easy to walk on Meg, very narrow and steep in places and lots of loose stones. it’s the loose that bothers me now, just the thought of sliding down and breaking a wrist or ankle 😦
      But I was prepared for this one as I really wanted to get close to the building so had my ‘proper’ walking boots on! Mindst you I did see several young women in just flip-flops (thongs to you) motoring along [sigh…]

  1. Having just watched the new series of ‘Poldark’ (mainly for the scenery, but it wasn’t that bad…) this could be a scene straight from it, ‘Wheal Leisure’ mine, once busy extracting tin and copper. Those Cornish tin mines are so evocative of the county. Great shot Jude, and I didn’t mind the sea at all.
    Regards as always, Pete. x

    1. Thanks Pete. Yes this is very Poldark isn’t it? I liked the program too, especially for the scenery, although I gather it wasn’t all filmed in Cornwall. Much better than the Jamaica Inn drama which I stopped watching almost immediately.

      It was a very cold, windy day when I took this photo, so no lovely blue sea like on my Day 1 photo. I shall have to go back on a sunnier day, even better, at sunset, as long as I can get off the cliff before it grows dark!

  2. The town scenes representing Truro were filmed in a place called Corsham, in Wiltshire. http://www.visitwiltshire.co.uk/explore/towns-and-villages/corsham-p462523 I have never been, but it looks well-worth a visit. Some of the interiors were filmed in Bath, but all the locations other than these are Cornish.
    Jamaica Inn could have been so good, without the impenetrable accents, and too-dark filming. I didn’t make it all the way through the first episode of that series. x

  3. Now this is excellent timing, Jude. We are off to see the relatives later this month and are always on the lookout for some new places to add to our favourites…

    1. You are in luck Tess, there is a bench just out of sight of this picture with a lovely view of the coast and the ruins. It was a bit too cold and windy on this particular day though to
      do much sitting around!

  4. It’s like stepping back in time seeing these isn’t it? Have you by any chance been a Poldark fan? Thanks for the nomination, I’m taking part 🙂

    1. I have Gilly. Thoroughly loved the series, so much better than Jamaica Inn, which I didn’t even complete watching the first episode! I noticed you have started the challenge already. Glad you could join in 🙂

  5. How beautiful! I was going to say too that it’s a scene straight out of a Poldark novel. I have all the books and read them again recently. It would be amazing to see on one of the stormy days that Winston Graham describes so vividly. Thanks for the nomination. I’ll take it up in a couple of weeks!

    1. Can you get the latest Poldark series there? It is well worth seeing if you can find it. Of course I watched it purely for the scenery not the actor…

  6. Oh this photo excites me as we are off to Cornwall soon for a week’s holiday. We are staying in a log cabin near Portruan I think. We only get one week a year and as hubby is on dialysis he has to go to Truro hospital for 3 of our days. However, we always have a wonderful time.

    1. Polruan maybe? Near Fowey? I am so sorry to hear about your hubby, but it is good that you can manage to get away and Cornwall is very relaxing. Enjoy your stay 🙂

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