Flashback Friday #8

This is an old post from my flower and garden blog Earth Laughs in Flowers which was posted on this date in 2017, the first time I saw these appear in my new garden, and it is rather appropriate that these same little lightbulbs of colour are flowering once again.


And all the woods are alive with the murmur and sound of Spring,
And the rose-bud breaks into pink on the climbing briar,
And the crocus-bed is a quivering moon of fire
Girdled round with the belt of an amethyst ring.
~ from:  Magdalen Walks by Oscar Wilde

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A delightful and unexpected addition to my garden this month.


This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.

Vancouver Revisited: Stanley Park

I have been fortunate to have visited the lovely city of Vancouver on Canada’s west coast twice and written several posts about both trips. This one which is about the beautiful Stanley Park (click link for a map of the park) at the tip of the downtown city has never seen much in the way of traffic so I thought I would reblog it as it truly is a magnificent area for discovering nature.  There are 27 km (17 miles) of trails winding through this lush rainforest of towering red cedar, hemlock and Douglas fir.

The park covers 1,000 acres and is a wonderful green space to have so close to a city. Trails and the seawall path take you around and through the park with so much to see. Stanley Park teems with an amazing variety of wildlife. Douglas squirrels, raccoons, river otters, beavers, salamanders, purple sea stars and Pacific Great Blue Herons—at least 500 species are known to live in the park. You could probably spend a week exploring this park, but if you only have time for a quick look then please join me on this short walk.

(just watch out for the cyclists and the inline skaters along the path! They are supposed to travel counter-clockwise so if you walk clockwise at least you will see them coming towards you!)

Please leave any comments on the original post.

home thoughts from abroad

Home thoughts from abroad is a new series on Travel Words featuring a single photograph that reminds me of a country visited and showing something that uniquely identifies it as being ‘abroad’.

My one and so far only trip to New Zealand was four years ago. My son and his Kiwi partner took me over to Raglan to meet the in laws. I fell in love with the incredible green landscape of the north island and the black sandy beaches which sparkled in the sun. 

This is the last of the Home Thoughts from Abroad series. I hope you have enjoyed travelling with me this year to places from my past. It has been lovely to go back in time and relive some of the many places I have been fortunate to visit.

Time x Square

Time’s running out in December’s square month hosted by the lovely Becky. The photos don’t necessarily have to be of a timepiece, but are open to interpretation to reflect time in some way, or sayings such as ‘the passing of time’, ‘a stitch in time’, or ‘time running away from you’.

Day 26: A Prehistoric Time

There is evidence of ancient life in the rocks beneath Whitcliffe Common, Ludlow, preserved as fossils. Indeed, some are scientifically very important, but most are tiny shells, difficult to see, and not obviously very special. Such remains reflect the nature of life some 420 million years ago, a period known as the Silurian. In order to raise awareness and give an idea of what the more spectacular creatures looked like when they were alive at the time the Whitcliffe rocks were formed, a series of six fossil casts have been made of Silurian animals, placed at intervals along the Bread Walk.

Orthoceras, a cephalopod with similarities to the modern squid and cuttlefish. These creatures liked coral reefs and so are hardly ever found in the muddy shallow waters around Ludlow. Only the hard cone is preserved, never the soft head and tentacles, so this is an artist’s reconstruction!  The real fossils are from 5 to 15 cm long.

Source: Friends of Whitcliffe Common

To join in with the Squares challenge please visit Becky for instructions. Remember the only proper rule is that the photo must be SQUARE.

December Squares | Day Twenty-six

Time x Square

Time for another square month hosted by the lovely Becky. The photos don’t necessarily have to be of a timepiece, but are open to interpretation to reflect time in some way, or sayings such as ‘the passing of time’, ‘a stitch in time’, or time running away from you.

Day 23: One Day at a Time

Hemerocallis (daylilies) produce elegant, usually trumpet-like blooms in summer and are easy to grow in many gardens. Individual flowers are short-lived but each plant produces many flowers, so displays will last for weeks.

To join in with the Squares challenge please visit Becky for instructions. Remember the only proper rule is that the photo must be SQUARE.

December Squares | Day Twenty-three