Bury St Edmunds

Another stop en route to Norwich was Bury St Edmunds primarily to see the Abbey and the Abbey gardens, but when we got there we were enticed into the cathedral instead. Bury St Edmunds grew up around the powerful Abbey of St Edmunds in the Middle Ages. For 500 years pilgrims came from all over the world to worship at his shrine. After the Dissolution of the Monasteries (yep – good ole Henry VIII again), the abbey church – one of the largest Norman buildings in Europe – fell into decline.

But before I take you into that wonderful building here’s a glimpse of the Abbey and surrounding area.

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We parked in Angel Hill, a cobbled square which is opposite the Cathedral and the Abbey Gate and in front of the very colourful Angel Hotel (above). When I drive through historic places like this I always feel guilty – cars ought not to be allowed, just pedestrians and maybe a horse and carriage. Continue reading Bury St Edmunds

Lavenham Guildhall

The Guildhall of Corpus Christi (NT) Market Place

Set in the picturesque Market Place is the Guildhall of Corpus Christi, built in 1529 by a wealthy religious guild, this building is one of the loveliest timber-framed buildings in the country. Inside you can learn all about the people, industries and events that have shaped this village throughout time.

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The exhibitions have been cleverly created using the eyes and voices of those who worked, lived and were imprisoned here. Their stories will surprise and shock you. Continue reading Lavenham Guildhall

Thursday’s Special

Ditherington-Flaxmill-(1)

The Ditherington Flax Mill is one of Shrewsbury’s most important buildings. Constructed in 1796 as the spinning works of Marshall, Benyon and Bage it later became the Maltings and as the first wholly iron-framed building in the world, is the great-grand-daddy of New York’s mighty skyscrapers.

Throughout the 1990s it was left empty and decaying, and various ideas for regeneration have been and gone, most failing due to a lack of private sector investment. Now it is in the hands of Historic England in partnership with Shropshire Council and Friends of the Flaxmill Maltings. Let’s hope its future is secure.

Ditherington-Flaxmill-(4)

Paula’s (Lost in Translation) challenge this week is Traces of the Past

Thursday’s Special

signal box

The Severn Bridge Signal Box is often described as “a cathedral among signal boxes” by enthusiasts. Found just beyond Shrewsbury Station it was built in 1910 and one of the largest in Europe.

The massive Greek Doric column in the background is 133 feet 6 inches tall and towers over Abbey Foregate with a statue of Lord Hill (1772-1842) on top. Lord Hill was the Duke of Wellington’s right-hand man in the Peninsula Wars and at the Battle of Waterloo when his horse was shot from under him. He succeeded Wellington as Commander-in-chief of the army in 1828.

Paula’s (Lost in Translation) challenge this week is Traces of the Past