Flashback Friday #30

Back in 2015 I used to take part regularly in a monthly challenge hosted by Dawn from ‘The Day After’ who invited participants to post pictures of any windows that  they find curious, inviting, photogenic, or in some way tell a story.


Painted Ladies of San Francisco

The “Painted Ladies” of San Francisco sounds quite scandalous, but is actually a nickname for the city’s Victorian and Edwardian mansions with their genteel pastel hues and feminine façades, lacy wooden mantles and perfectly pitched roofs.

Postcard Row

One of the most photographed vistas is from Alamo Square on the corner of Hays and Steiner where you get a background of the modern city that contrasts with these lovely ladies. It is sometimes known as “Postcard Row.” The houses were built between 1892 and 1896 by developer Matthew Kavanaugh, who lived next door in the 1892 mansion at 722 Steiner Street.  The definition of a painted lady is a Victorian with three or more paint colours. So, even though the seven on Steiner Street are the most famous — there are several other painted ladies in the neighbourhood to enjoy.

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Explore the streets, parks and vistas around Scott Street, McAllister, Haight Street, Steiner and Pierce that tell the story of a Victorian era and discover more beautiful mansions, but be warned, it is very hilly around here so it can be quite a strenuous walk. Alamo square is a great place to sit and rest and admire the view after your walk around the neighbourhood.

I walked about 10 blocks from the Misión San Francisco de Asís on 16th Street which is some distance away, through Duboce Park. You can of course take public transport to Alamo Square, but then you’d miss an awful lot of this wonderful architecture. And don’t forget to look up!

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This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.

October Squares | Day Six

This month Becky (the Queen of Squares) has challenged us to find lines. In Squares naturally. That is the only proper ‘rule’. I have been dipping into the archives for this one, as well as finding local lines.

Crossed Lines

Building in Sydney, Australia. November 2014. Click image to enlarge.

October Squares | Day Six

And because I deliberately composed this shot on a tilt and cropped in tightly to highlight the crossing of the vertical and horizontal contrasting lines I am linking to the lovely Patti’s post.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #66 | Filling the Frame

Paris Focus: Walking the Right Bank Passages

Paris in springtime is what most people think about when the city of Paris pops up. I am sure it is utterly wonderful, strolling alongside the River Seine hand in hand with a loved one, perhaps a river tour on one of the cruise boats, sipping champagne in an old-fashioned intimate restaurant where the waiters wear those long black aprons and hover politely. But what to do when it rains? Paris in the rain can be cold and miserable. Yes, there are the numerous art galleries to visit, but if you have already been there and done that then perhaps a wander through the 19th century ‘Les Passages’ might do the trick.

Put on your walking shoes, hide the credit card and let’s go exploring!

Les Passages

I shall also add the original post to Jo’s Walks

Please leave any comments on the original post.

WPC: Unusual

I am in Doncaster, South Yorkshire at the moment as my son is in hospital there. The daily route to the hospital goes along Town Moor Avenue which is opposite the racecourse. The field itself I remember as where my children played school sports. The houses along this road are quite spectacular (and very large) and today I managed to snap one of the more unusual ones through the bus window.

This conservation area contains Town Field itself and the planned suburban expansion of Doncaster’s residential area carried out in the early twentieth century along its northern side. The architecture of most of the buildings date from this period. The land was developed by Harold Arnold and Son from 1901 and it can be seen that the architects were influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement of the late 19th century. This was based on a dislike of mechanical ornamentation and a belief in the return to hand craftsmanship and simpler forms.

Buildings are mainly two-storied, although along and towards Thorne Road there are three-storied development. They are predominantly in red brick with slate or small red clay plain tiles. There are often elaborate forms of buildings with decorative architectural features, such as windows, doors, chimneys, bays, turrets, gables and porches. There are also areas of half timbering, stucco and decorative brickwork. Front boundary walls are generally low brick walls with castellated terracotta decorative copings often backed with hedges or shrubs.

Doncaster – Town Field was designated a conservation area on 8 April 1991.

Source: DMBC