Cee’s Which Way Challenge: Finger Posts

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: There is no specific theme given.  It just needs to be some sort of  ‘Which Way’. The possibilities are endless.

 Join in with the challenge or to view other ‘Which Ways’.

fingerpost (sometimes referred to as a guide post) is a traditional type of sign post in the United Kingdom and Ireland, consisting of a post with one or more arms – known as fingers – pointing in the direction of travel to places named on the fingers. The posts have traditionally been made from cast iron or wood, with poles painted in black, white or grey and fingers with black letters on a white background, often including distance information in miles. In most cases, they are used to give guidance for road users, but examples also exist on the canal network and walking trails for instance.

Wooden finger post with mileage on  the Coastal Path in Norfolk
Modern Finger post in cast iron in a park in Herefordshire

There was plenty of scope for distinctive spread of designs which remains to today.  Roundel designs can include the junction name, a village name, highway authority names in full or initials, and some can include grid numbers.

Roundel in Hampshire
Roundel in Hampshire with the village name of Burley
A Roundel in Norfolk with the village name of Hindringham
A Roundel in Norfolk with the village name of Hindringham

The fingers also vary with some (Cornwall and Devon) being square ended, Dorset is curved and Somerset triangular ended.  Note the different shapes at the top of the column too.

Triangular in Somerset
Triangular in Somerset
Square in Norfolk
Square in Norfolk
Curved in Gloucestershire

And note the mileage information in this post in Somerset. We were parked in Bossington, so only had 1/4 mile to walk back to the car.

Somerset Mileag
Somerset  County Council (SCC)  with the triangular top

Most finger posts are coloured white, black and grey, but there are others. Red ones are seen in Dorset and you may find green ones that indicate a minor road or ‘drift’ road. Brown signs (below) indicate a tourist site or location and blue signs indicate a cycle network. These are more recent.

Jun 01 2009_Somerset_6871

So, have you seen any unusual finger posts on your travels? If you have then I’d like to hear about them.

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: Maps

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: There is no specific theme given.  It just needs to be some sort of  ‘Which Way’. The possibilities are endless.

 Join in with the challenge or to view other ‘Which Ways’.

When you are out and about you might come across information maps of the area you are walking in. It’s often a good idea to take a look at these before you set off on your walk or you may find that 2 mile stroll you were thinking of becomes a 10 mile hike!

(above: the various routes in the Queenswood Arboretum, Herefordshire)

Pathway through the Arboretum
Pathway through the Arboretum

Watch your step in the Skomer Marine Nature Reserve, Pembrokeshire.

Skomer

access to the deer park
Access to the Deer Park

Finding your way in Marloes and St Brides Bay, Pembrokeshire with a lovely framed sign in the middle of the village designed by children from the school.

Marloes

Marloes Clock Tower
Marloes Clock Tower

Having a stroll around Penrose Park in Helston, Cornwall

DSCF3163

and choosing the route to take:

DSCF3164

Walking through Penrose Park
Walking through Penrose Park

I hope you have some happy wanderings this spring 🙂

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: Temple of the Winds

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: There is no specific theme given.  It just needs to be some sort of  ‘Which Way’. The possibilities are endless.

black-down

We are back again on Black Down (see an earlier post here) where there are several trails across the highest point in the South Downs National Park.

View-from-Temple-of-the-Winds

One of the walks is to the “Temple of Winds” named after a Bronze Age circular bank where you have a view right across West Sussex to the coast. There is a lovely curved stone bench where you can stop a while and drink in the views.

black-down-2

Join in with the challenge or view other ‘Which Ways’.

On Black Down
On Black Down

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: Black Down

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: There is no specific theme given.  It just needs to be some sort of  ‘Which Way’. The possibilities are endless.

Black Down Ridden Corner

You came and looked and loved the view, long known and loved by me, Green Sussex fading into blue with one grey glimpse of sea.

~ Tennyson

These images are from the trails on the Black Down in West Sussex, close to the Surrey border. It is the highest point in the South Downs National Park.  I used to go here a lot when I lived in nearby Haslemere as there are several lovely pathways on the chalk down with spectacular views over the countryside.

Black Down Trail

You may even find black cows grazing  as they have been introduced to help manage the land, controlling the scrub to encourage the heather to thrive. You can walk along chalky paths or ancient sunken lanes and drove ways with the steep hedgerows filled with blackberries in the autumn. Bog ponds come and go. Scots pines, mountain ash and beech hanger woodland provide welcome shade when the midsummer sun is burning down. And it is a perfect place to star-gaze on a clear night.

 Join in with the challenge or view other ‘Which Ways’.