Cee’s Which Way Challenge: Temple of the Winds

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: There is no specific theme given.  It just needs to be some sort of  ‘Which Way’. The possibilities are endless.

black-down

We are back again on Black Down (see an earlier post here) where there are several trails across the highest point in the South Downs National Park.

View-from-Temple-of-the-Winds

One of the walks is to the “Temple of Winds” named after a Bronze Age circular bank where you have a view right across West Sussex to the coast. There is a lovely curved stone bench where you can stop a while and drink in the views.

black-down-2

Join in with the challenge or view other ‘Which Ways’.

On Black Down
On Black Down

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: Black Down

Cee’s Which Way Challenge: There is no specific theme given.  It just needs to be some sort of  ‘Which Way’. The possibilities are endless.

Black Down Ridden Corner

You came and looked and loved the view, long known and loved by me, Green Sussex fading into blue with one grey glimpse of sea.

~ Tennyson

These images are from the trails on the Black Down in West Sussex, close to the Surrey border. It is the highest point in the South Downs National Park.  I used to go here a lot when I lived in nearby Haslemere as there are several lovely pathways on the chalk down with spectacular views over the countryside.

Black Down Trail

You may even find black cows grazing  as they have been introduced to help manage the land, controlling the scrub to encourage the heather to thrive. You can walk along chalky paths or ancient sunken lanes and drove ways with the steep hedgerows filled with blackberries in the autumn. Bog ponds come and go. Scots pines, mountain ash and beech hanger woodland provide welcome shade when the midsummer sun is burning down. And it is a perfect place to star-gaze on a clear night.

 Join in with the challenge or view other ‘Which Ways’.