Weekly Photo Challenge: Object

Cheri asks “In this week’s challenge, I’d like you to use one tangible object as both your inspiration and subject.”

There is a rule of thirds in photography (imagine your photo with a grid of nine squares) which basically says that you should position your focal point on the intersection of one of the horizontal and vertical lines so that the composition of the  subject is pleasing.

object

There is also a time when you should break the rules, when placing the subject in the centre actually works.  Here I have positioned the padlock almost in the dead centre to capture a glimpse of another padlock fastened to the metal twisted wire below. If I cropped the image in either direction then the lock would have been isolated – it wasn’t as you can see in the header photo above – but I focused on this one because of its colour and the fact that it looks like a heart.

Note on photos: Butcher’s Bridge, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Couples write their names on a padlock, lock it and throw the key into the river – thus locking in their love for one another forever. The trend is believed to have been inspired by a cult novel, “I Want You” by Federico Moccia, who says it is “better than disfiguring graffiti”.

If you would like to see what others have come up with for this challenge then go to the Daily Post @ WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge 

A Lingering Look at Windows: # 5

This weekly challenge is hosted by Dawn from ‘The Day After’ who invites participants to post pictures of any windows that  they find curious, inviting, photogenic, or in some way tell a story. Visit her blog to see more windows and/or to join in with the challenge.

ludlow feathers

Situated towards the top of Corve Street  in Ludlow (Shropshire) close to where another of the main gates would have been, is the world-famous timber façade of the Feathers Hotel built during the reign of James I. The ostrich feather motifs can still be seen on the collars of the three street gables, although now weathered over the centuries. It only became an inn in 1670.

feathers 1

D for Decorative Details (on the Taj Mahal)

frizztext hosts a weekly A – Z Challenge

A_Z logo

Event Type: General Blogging

Start Date: Tuesdays, recurring weekly

Description: Every Tuesday I offer the “A to Z challenge”, walking step by step through the alphabet.

If you would like to join in then please click here.

white marble dados that have been sculpted with realistic bas relief depictions of flowers and vinesOn the lower walls of the tomb there are white marble dados that have been sculpted with realistic bas relief depictions of flowers and vines.

The marble has been polished to emphasise the exquisite detailing of the carvings and the dado frames and archway spandrels have been decorated with pietra dura inlays of highly stylised, almost geometric, vines, flowers and fruits. The inlay stones are of yellow marble, jasper and jade, polished and leveled to the surface of the walls

????????????????????????????????????????????Given that Islamic Art forbids the use of the human image, the work of Mother Nature is the obvious spotlight. That, and transcripts of The Koran that run around all the doorways, makes the delicacy and the detail of all the decoration of this lovely place a true joy to behold.

In line with the Islamic prohibition against the use of anthropomorphic forms, the decorative elements can be grouped into either calligraphy, abstract forms (geometric and herringbone patterns) or vegetative motifs.

Sunday Stills, the next challenge: Bad Weather

Ed is a truck driving photographer from Tennessee who hosts a photography challenge blog called Sunday Stills here on WordPress.

This week Ed would like to see any BAD WEATHER pics.

bad-weather-2

And what better weather photos to show you after all the rain we have experienced in the UK this month than floods – these are the River Severn overflowing in Shrewsbury.

bad-weather

A Word a Week Challenge: Undulate

A man of thought must feel the thought that is parent of the universe: that the masses of nature do undulate and flow.

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

Every week Sue from ‘A Word in Your Ear’ dips into her English Oxford dictionary and picks a word on the page that it falls open at. The challenge is to post a photograph, poem, story – whatever the genre you like best to describe what that word means to you.

This week’s challenge is Undulate (click to join in with the challenge)

wave-door-1

un·du·late v. un·du·lat·edun·du·lat·ingun·du·lates
v.tr.

1. To cause to move in a smooth wavelike motion.
2. To give a wavelike appearance or form to.

wave-door-3The wavy line on these doors at Mission San Juan Bautista (St John the Baptist) signifies the River of Life.