2020 Photo Challenge #42

October’s theme / technique: Seascapes

This can be your typical beach scene of blue water, white sand and beach umbrellas, or it can be more dramatic. Above all make sure you are safe and not likely to be cut off by the tide if you go wandering along the shoreline. Winter storms can make for dramatic shots of waves breaking over a promenade or against the cliffs, but don’t take risks.

Consider three essentials – place, time and means. The most important being place. To discover the perfect position you might have to take your time. When you see a view that looks promising, put your camera away, slow down, walk and look, walk a little more and look a little harder.

    • You might like to soften the water or freeze the waves..
    • Rocky outcrops, lighthouses, surfers, lifeguards all make good subjects

If you are unable to take seascapes or don’t have any in the archives that you would like to use then by all means substitute seascapes with landscapes. Look for patterns or textures within an urban environment. Try using different depths of field as stated below.

This week's assignment - look for patterns and / or textures along the seashore, this might be in the rocks or shells or seaweed. Try using different depths of field with the same subject then compare them to see which you prefer.

If you would like to join in with the 2020 photo challenge then please take a look at my 2020 Photo Challenge page. No complicated rules, just a camera required 🙂

    • Create your own post with some information about how you composed the shot.
    • Include a link to this page in your post so others can find it too
    • Add the tag #2020PhotoChallenge so everyone can find your entry easily in the WP Reader
    • Get your post(s) in by the end of the month, as the new theme begins on the first Sunday in November.

2020 Photo Challenge #41

October’s theme / technique: Seascapes

This can be your typical beach scene of blue water, white sand and beach umbrellas, or it can be more dramatic. Above all make sure you are safe and not likely to be cut off by the tide if you go wandering along the shoreline. Winter storms can make for dramatic shots of waves breaking over a promenade or against the cliffs, but don’t take risks.

Consider three essentials – place, time and means. The most important being place. To discover the perfect position you might have to take your time. When you see a view that looks promising, put your camera away, slow down, walk and look, walk a little more and look a little harder.

    • You might like to soften the water or freeze the waves..
    • Rocky outcrops, lighthouses, surfers, lifeguards all make good subjects

If you are unable to take seascapes or don’t have any in the archives that you would like to use then by all means substitute seascapes with landscapes. This week it is easy – simply capture a sunset or sunrise or a reflection.

This week's assignment - highlight a dramatic sunset or sunrise or reflections on the beach

If you would like to join in with the 2020 photo challenge then please take a look at my 2020 Photo Challenge page. No complicated rules, just a camera required 🙂

    • Create your own post with some information about how you composed the shot.
    • Include a link to this page in your post so others can find it too
    • Add the tag #2020PhotoChallenge so everyone can find your entry easily in the WP Reader
    • Get your post(s) in by the end of the month, as the new theme begins on the first Sunday in November.

2020 Photo Challenge #40

October’s theme / technique: Seascapes

If you want to see what this month’s assignments are in advance then please click here. All the assignments are available from the menu on the left under the 2020 Photo Challenge / Assignments.

This can be your typical beach scene of blue water, white sand and beach umbrellas, or it can be more dramatic. Above all make sure you are safe and not likely to be cut off by the tide if you go wandering along the shoreline. Winter storms can make for dramatic shots of waves breaking over a promenade or against the cliffs, but don’t take risks.

Consider three essentials – place, time and means. The most important being place. To discover the perfect position you might have to take your time. When you see a view that looks promising, put your camera away, slow down, walk and look, walk a little more and look a little harder.

    • You might like to soften the water or freeze the waves..
    • Rocky outcrops, lighthouses, surfers, lifeguards all make good subjects

If you are unable to take seascapes or don’t have any in the archives that you would like to use then by all means substitute seascapes with landscapes.

This week's assignment - try and capture something unique or something ordinary but in an unique way

Capturing my favourite lighthouse (Godrevy) in the fog remains one of my most favourite images (August 2018). Summer fog or sea fret is very different to the cold grey stuff in winter and very common here in Cornwall during August, so be warned if you are thinking of holidaying down here!

If you would like to join in with the 2020 photo challenge then please take a look at my 2020 Photo Challenge page. No complicated rules, just a camera required 🙂

    • Create your own post with some information about how you composed the shot.
    • Include a link to this page in your post so others can find it too
    • Add the tag #2020PhotoChallenge so everyone can find your entry easily in the WP Reader
    • Get your post(s) in by the end of the month, as the new theme begins on the first Sunday in November.

Thanks to everyone who took part in last month’s POV assignments. I have tried to leave a comment on all the blogs that have linked to mine, but I have noticed in some cases the comment has not shown, so please check your spam folder!

2020 Photo Challenge #39

September’s theme / technique: What’s the POV?

The phrase ‘point of view‘ in photography simply means the position from which the camera sees the scene. It refers to the angle or place from where you shoot. Try different ways of photographing the same subject rather than looking at it from front on. How you shoot a scene can determine the mood and effect a photo has on the viewer.

      • Use your feet and move around the subject looking for an optimum angle.
      • Don’t be afraid to get down on your stomach or climb a tree.
      • Look for different and dramatic angles that will make your images more striking.
        • Shooting from eye-level helps your viewer connect with the subject.
        • Look up – the subject will seem more powerful
        • Look down – the subject will appear smaller, inferior.
      • Indirect – focus on the shadow rather than the subject
      • Abstract – Spin around or tilt the frame
      • Take a photo with something between you and your subject
This month's final assignment - Shoot your subject from above. Now the subject seems small and the viewer in charge.

Continue reading 2020 Photo Challenge #39

2020 Photo Challenge #38

September’s theme / technique: What’s the POV?

The phrase ‘point of view‘ in photography simply means the position from which the camera sees the scene. It refers to the angle or place from where you shoot. Try different ways of photographing the same subject rather than looking at it from front on.

      • Use your feet and move around the subject looking for an optimum angle.
      • Don’t be afraid to get down on your stomach or climb a tree.
      • Look for different and dramatic angles that will make your images more striking.
        • Shooting from eye-level helps your viewer connect with the subject.
        • Look up – the subject will seem more powerful
        • Look down – the subject will appear smaller, inferior.
      • Indirect – focus on the shadow rather than the subject
      • Abstract – Spin around or tilt the frame
      • Take a photo with something between you and your subject
This week's assignment - Shoot your subject from below. Looking up will give the illusion of smallness (the viewer). An upwards angle will make the subject seem much more important.

Continue reading 2020 Photo Challenge #38