We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Quite an odd date today too: 22/02/2022 which is a palindrome date, you can read it both forwards and backwards (at least in the UK). Day 22

The secretary bird’s English name was once thought to come from the 1800s, when Europeans first spotted these birds. Back then, male secretaries wore grey tailcoats and dark knee-length pants. They also used goose-quill pens that they carried behind their ears. This long-legged bird shares many of these same physical features: long, dark quills at the back of the head; long, grey wing and tail feathers that resemble a tailcoat; and black feathers that go midway down the legs like short pants.

We are into the last week of the ODD SQUARES month so please join in with Becky and the Square gang; the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day 17

Surely a face only a mother could love? California condors are one of the largest flying birds. They are known for their enormous black wings, extraordinary eyesight, and an inquisitive and engaging intelligence. Indigenous tribes in North America have great respect for the condor and see it as a symbol of power. Some call it the thunderbird because they believe the bird brings thunder to the skies with the beating of its huge wings.

Adult California condors have a distinctive pink head and neck that is bare of feathers. That bare head is perfectly designed to keep rotting food from sticking to it as the birds eat. The skin on an adult condor’s head can also express some emotions. It turns a deep red-pink during courtship or when the birds are excited or alarmed.

If you want to join in either daily, weekly or just on the odd occasion then please visit Becky, the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day Seven

With their pink and crimson plumage, long legs and necks, and strongly hooked bills, flamingos cannot be mistaken for any other type of bird. Today, images of flamingos are found in literature (Alice used them as croquet mallets in Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll), and immortalized as plastic lawn ornaments!

American flamingos, a subspecies of greater flamingo, are the brightest, showing their true colours of red, pink, or orange on their legs, bills, and faces. It’s funny to watch them marching: the large, tightly packed flock walks together as one, before switching direction abruptly.

If you want to join in either daily, weekly or just on the odd occasion then please visit Becky, the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

We’re goin’ to the zoo, zoo, zoo

This month Becky’s Squares are focusing on odd things – you can interpret this any way you want so I am going to take you all to the zoo this month. San Diego Zoo to be precise and the photos featured will be either odd looking animals, animals with odd names, odd facts or slightly odd photos. I hope you’ll enjoy my selection.

Day Five

The Bateleur eagle is the most famous of the snake eagles. Bateleur is French for ‘tightrope-walker’. This name was probably chosen because of its distinctive aerial acrobatics. The nuptial aerial display is spectacular, with steep dives by the male at the female. She will roll on her back, presenting her claws and then roll on over to right herself as he hurtles past. There may be follow-the-leader dipping and rolling flight, and there may be 360 degree lateral ‘barrel’ rolls, which is often accompanied by a very loud slapping of the wings together. This percussion can be heard by humans for some great distance. All of this may be accompanied by very loud crowing calls.

It is the only member of the genus Terathopius and may be the origin of the “Zimbabwe Bird”, the national emblem of Zimbabwe.

If you want to join in either daily, weekly or just on the odd occasion then please visit Becky, the only rule is that the main photo MUST be a square – that is four equal sides! You have been warned 😉

Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

The world is a kaleidoscope¹ of colour so this month let’s celebrate that with the brightest / most colourful images you can find.

¹(Something that is made up of a lot of different and frequently changing colours or elements)

Rainbow Lorikeet

Let me, O let me bathe my soul in colours;
let me swallow the sunset and drink the rainbow.”
― Khalil Gibran