Eassie Old Church: Gravestones

Whilst looking at the Pictish Stone in this churchyard I had to take a look at the unusual headstones, including a series of tablestones.

I am always curious to see what symbols have been used on the headstones. Here the hourglass is used which symbolises a short life or swiftness of time. The cross and skulls as well as angel wings are common. But my favourite was the pressing iron and shears that indicate the grave was that of a tailor.

Sometimes the dates indicate some illness struck a family; above the two children died within a month of each other. The son only 4 days short of his 7th birthday and his sister not even 5½ years old. What illness struck them down? Measles? Smallpox? Influenza?

The grounds of this cemetery appear to be well looked after, the grass is short and the area around the stones is cleared, but it is sad to see some of the old headstones broken and discarded, some in piles, others propped up against the walls of the ruined church. Lichens and moss make some of them illegible.

A war grave stands proud in the cemetery. Though it too raises questions. How did the young soldier die? And what is 3/5th Black Watch? ¹

When we take such great care to protect one ancient stone (the Pictish Stone) we also need to protect stones that in the future would also relate our history.

Thursday’s Special | Traces of the Past

¹ 3/4th, 3/5th, 3/6th and 3/7th Battalions
Formed at home bases in March and April 1915. All moved to Bridge of Earn and later in 1915 to Ripon.
8 April 1916 : renamed 4th to 7th Reserve Bns; on 1 September 1916 4th absorbed all others.
Moved to Edinburgh in May 1918.

Discovering St Leonards

One of my favourite places to take a local walk is in the burial ground of St Leonard’s in Ludlow. The grounds are now a naturalised area for people to enjoy nature and wildlife, an attractive environment that residents and visitors alike can enjoy. There are many trees including Yew trees which were grown to make bows, but as the berries are poisonous to animals (and humans), the trees had to be grown in places like churchyards where animals were excluded.

P1200357

There are also some ageing Lawson’s Cypresses and self-sown Sycamores and Horse-Chestnuts. A large number of birds, butterflies and a colony of rabbits live in the grounds and there are many benches on which to sit and rest and enjoy the birdsong and the countryside views, as well as a few picnic tables and benches situated in a grass clearing.

P1200397

P1200355

I love to wander around the monuments and select interesting carvings, words, shapes to photograph. Often hidden by clumps of stinging nettles and moss or lichens each time I visit I see something different. Continue reading Discovering St Leonards

Seeking Angels

It was a Sydney blogger, Lignum Draco, who introduced me to the angels of Waverley Cemetery. And as an avid (photographic) collector of unusual and interesting headstones it was a place added to the list of “things to do in Sydney”.

DSCF7436

And after a superb brunch with another infamous Aussie blogger, the loquacious Margaret Rose, I set off to find me some angels.

DSCF7391

I didn’t find the ones LD depicted, but that is probably just as well because my images are nothing like the quality of his, but I did find some that I liked.

DSCF7424

It is the final  resting place for notable Australian poets Henry Lawson, Henry Kendall and Dorothea Mackellar who penned the immortal ode to Australia with the lines:

“I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains,
Of ragged mountain ranges,
Of droughts and flooding rains.
I love her far horizons,
I love her jewel-sea,
Her beauty and her terror
The wide brown land for me!”

DSCF7385

 And I’m loving angels…

angel 2

angel 3

One Day One World Project: 21:00 – 22:00

The Kirkyard in Kirkcudbright

The site of St Cuthbert’s Kirk lies in the older part of the kirkyard in Kirkcudbright. The ancient church was dedicated to Saint Cuthbert, the patron saint of Anglian kingdom of Northumbria. The town is named after it.

Rising above the town, the kirkyard can be viewed from across the River Dee and is a perfect spot to watch the sun set.

Lisa of the blog NorthWest Frame of Mind has decided to run a different project over the next 24 weeks. To try to show what is happening in different parts of the world (if you all join in) at a particular time of day. If you would like to participate you have until next Saturday midnight to post a photo or write about what is happening in your part of the world.   This week is between 21:00 – 22:00.  I hope you’ll join in! See links for more details.