Flashback Friday #14

This post was originally published on April 02 2015 to celebrate Easter windows for the monthly challenge hosted by Dawn from ‘The Day After’ and appropriately in time for Good Friday this year! Happy Easter everybody!


“Walking around Ludlow before Easter you can’t help noticing all the sheep and fluffy chicks and eggs adorning the window displays in the town.

The bookshop, sweetshop and even the coffee shop have a spring feeling

The florist is a bit steamed up…

Continue reading Flashback Friday #14

Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

This month we will be looking for Yellow. A bright and happy colour and often associated with spring. The sun in the sky, heat and light. What yellows can you find in your world?

Field of bright yellow rapeseed in flower (canola) under a blue sky near Ludlow, Shropshire. Rapeseed is grown for the production of animal feed, vegetable oil for human consumption, and biodiesel.

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Field of golden sun
A dazzling azure blue sky
Heat up the summer

The last time I saw this golden field was in 2015. Four years after I first set eyes upon it. A good example of crop rotation. Growing above head height I had to hold the camera above my head to get some of these shots. As the pollen caused my eyes to water and my nose to sneeze, I think it was worth it…

Titterstone Clee Hill in the background

This is the last week for the colour yellow so if you have any left then please join in now. Next Sunday we will be looking for a different colour to jazz up the month of March.

Flashback Friday #2

This post was originally published on 8th January 2014 when I used to join in with Cee’s Which Way Challenge.

Shropshire has an odd name for its alleys or passageways, particularly those that pass through a building from one street to another – shuts – derived from shoots as in “shoots through”. In Ludlow there are a few of these as well as several cobbled lanes and hidden courtyards which date from the medieval period.

This post is a contribution to Fandango’s Flashback Friday. Have you got a post you wrote in the past on this particular day? The world might be glad to see it – either for the first time – or again if they’re long-time loyal readers.

Fanlight

The new January Squares challenge, hosted as ever by Becky, the Queen of Squares,  is all about ____light. That’s words ending in light. In this often dull month light of any kind is what we all need to lift our spirits as we wait impatiently for spring to begin. Click on the link to find out more.

fanlights

fanlight (noun) = A fanlight is a window, often semicircular or semi-elliptical in shape, with glazing bars or tracery sets radiating out like an open fan. It is placed over another window or a doorway

January Squares | Day Seventeen

A Ludlow Walkabout

I lived in Ludlow from 2011 to 2016 and spent many an hour walking around the town. On this walk we’ll begin in the Castle Square and head eastwards out of the market place calling in at Quality Square, a delightful cobbled courtyard dating back to the 16th century, for a good breakfast at  ‘The Wine Bar’¹. We’ll sit outside to enjoy the morning sunshine if possible, and listen to the chimes of the parish church bells. I’ll have the eggs Benedict with a black coffee please, but I can also recommend the full English breakfast.

Moving along Church Street one of three ‘cross’ streets that run in parallel (Church St, High St and Market St) we pass two carved heads that were moved to this site in 1743 from the site of a conduit brought into town in the 16th century though nothing remains of the conduit now. Two pubs along here, ‘The Rose & Crown’ and ‘The Church Inn’ offer decent pub food and real ales with the later doing a huge range of pies.

Slipping down College Street we find St Laurence’s Church, rebuilt in 1199 and extended between the 15th and 17th Centuries. This is an example of the perpendicular style of English church building. The tower is from the 15th century and is 135 ft (41m) high and can be seen from a great distance across the Marches and is often referred to as the Cathedral of the Marches. It has many fine features such as the wonderful stained glass windows and famous 15th century misericords, still looking like new and it is well worth a visit.

You can also climb the tower for superb views over the surrounding countryside, though I confess I never did. The church bells are famous too and the carillon plays a tune at 8am, noon, 4pm and 8pm with a different tune each day. A memorial plaque to A E Housman, famous for his poems ‘A Shropshire Lad’ can be found on the North wall near where his ashes are buried and a cherry tree has been planted in his memory. Housman in fact is not a Shropshire lad, but came from Bromsgrove in Worcestershire. Continue reading A Ludlow Walkabout