X for XV century Misericords

frizztext hosts a weekly A – Z Challenge

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Event Type: General Blogging

Start Date: Tuesdays, recurring weekly

Description: Every Tuesday I offer the “A to Z challenge”, walking step by step through the alphabet.

If you would like to join in then please click here

Woman with Coif
S4 – representing womanhood, possibly a mother and daughters

We are quite lucky in Ludlow to have a very impressive Parish Church – St Laurence, which is so big that it can be seen from miles around and is known as ‘The Cathedral of the Marches’. Now none of this has to do with the letter X, but inside the church you can find twenty eight misericords dating from the XV century.

Seated Man with Scroll
S13 – this could be a pupil or schoolmaster at the school run by the Palmers’ Guild in Ludlow.

Now I don’t propose to show you all 28, but here are a few of my favourites.

Owl with eagles
S5 – the owl in medieval times was a dark symbol. Here it is being mobbed by two birds looking inwards, possibly eagles.

St Laurence’s Church has twenty eight misericords in the choir stalls which are of a quality usually associated with great cathedrals such as Worcester or Gloucester.

Monster with female face
N2 – a Harpy (young woman’s head with the body and wings of a bat) with her supporters (bats) creatures of darkness and symbols of evil.

Carved on the underside of the hinged choir seats each misericord is fashioned from a piece of timber some 26 inches (660 mm) long, 12 inches (300 mm) deep and 6 inches (150 mm) thick.

falcon and scales
N13 – Falcon and Fetterlocks, the personal badge of Richard Duke of York (1411 – 1460)

The misericords have a wide variety of themes and with Ludlow then being a royal stronghold there is a royal influence shown in a number of misericords. Wikipedia

Prince of Wales Feathers
N8 – since the mid-16th century the three ostrich feathers have been the personal badge of the Prince of Wales.
S6 – Swan flanked by leaves, the badge of the Bohun family though without the crown collar.

The header misericord is N4 – a mermaid holding a mirror in her right hand, a comb missing from her left. Two dolphins flank her.

One Day One World Project: 16:00 to 17:00 hours

Walking down by the River Teme I spotted this Mute swan family in the distance so naturally moved a little closer to get some photos. But not too close! They are very protective of their little ‘uns.

The Pen

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 The Cob and Cygnetscob-and-cygnets
A Handsome Fella

cob

Not an Ugly Duckling

cygnet

Lisa of the blog NorthWest Frame of Mind has decided to run a different project over the next 24 weeks. To try to show what is happening in different parts of the world (if you all join in) at a particular time of day.

If you would like to participate you have until next Saturday midnight to post a photo or write about what is happening in your part of the world between 16:00 – 17:00 this week.  I hope you’ll join in! See links for more details.

A Lingering Look at Windows #22

There are many ways to photograph the town of Ludlow from Whitcliffe Common – castle views, church views, town views framed by the trees or not.

Zooming in on the old town shows you the undulating rooftops, the multitude of chimney pots of varying shapes and sizes, and even a window or two.

chimneys-and-windows

This weekly challenge is hosted by Dawn from ‘The Day After’ who invites participants to post pictures of any windows that  they find curious, inviting, photogenic, or in some way tell a story. Visit her blog to see more windows and/or to join in with the challenge.

Priors Halton Loop

With the recent good weather I have been trying to get out for a daily walk. Last Sunday we set off towards Priors Halton farm, about a mile or so outside of Ludlow. It is one of the few flattish walks around here, as Ludlow is surrounded by hills.

Most walks in and around Ludlow begin with crossing a bridge. This time Dinham, with a glance at ‘Ludlow Beach’, as locals name the area on the Teme where it is often safe to paddle. Repairs are being made to the weir (including a by-pass to allow salmon moving 50 miles upstream to spawn an easier way through the river ) has meant changes to the ‘beach’ too. And today there are many more youths than usual. It is a hot day, though they are a bit big to swim in the extremely shallow waters – amazing to think how high the water level was only a couple of months ago.

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DSCF6524Instead of heading left along the Bread Walk or ahead up the Donkey Steps onto Whitcliffe Common, today we are continuing along the road towards Priors Halton. The road ends at Priors Halton farm,  but you can continue on foot or bicycle to Lady Halton or Oakly Park and even Bromfield where you will find Ludlow Food Centre, a café and restaurant.

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Lots of wild flowers in the hedgerow hidden amongst the clouds of cow parsley and May trees are flowering.

Look back and you’ll be rewarded with a dramatic view of the castle in its commanding position, chosen by Norman builder, Roger de Lacy in 1085.

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It’s amazing that only half a mile away from the town you feel deep in the heart of English countryside. The only sound is that of birds…

and sheep bleating…DSCF6567

At the farm we decided to return to Ludlow via one of the public footpaths, thus shortening the walk to around 3 miles instead of a 5 mile loop.

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A public footpath which during this dry weather, is easy to walk on. This is not always the case as, unlike the lane, this route is unpaved and gets very churned up and muddy.

Another public footpath leads to Lady Halton alongside the farmer’s field, but we’ll continue along this track today, heading towards Mortimer Forest. It is slightly uphill but a gentle climb.

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The views are good now that we are out of the high hedgerows. Look back towards  Priors Halton and you can see the farmhouse and also the south Shropshire hills in the background.

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We reach Middle Wood Road and turn left back to Ludlow.

DSCF6598Watch out for speeding cyclists!
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It is lovely and shady along this road as we walk along the edge of the woodland. Ludlow can be seen in the distance, crouching beneath Titterstone Clee Hill, which is about seven miles distant.

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And we are accompanied by orange-tipped butterflies flitting along the hedge, but never stopping for a photograph. Bluebells can be spotted up in the woodland, cow parsley appears again

butterfly

and we did get a shot of this little fellow, who may be a Wood White butterfly and some lovely new ferns.

ferns

Finally we reach Lower Road and Whitcliffe Common, where we found a bench to rest and enjoy the view of Ludow and the castle where a couple are enjoying their view from the bench next to the archway, which I mentioned on my Castle Walk.

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If you enjoy a walk, short or long, then you may enjoy visiting Jo’s Monday Walk where you are in for a treat.

One Day One World Project: 15:00 to 16:00 hours

Wednesday afternoon found me on top of the Vinnalls Loop in Mortimer Forest not very far from where I live. Having exhausted local walks I thought it was time I returned to this spot where you have panoramic views over Shropshire, Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Wales. It is a stiff climb up though!

south shropshire

 But what a view!

the-clee-hill

Lisa of the blog NorthWest Frame of Mind has decided to run a different project over the next 24 weeks. To try to show what is happening in different parts of the world (if you all join in) at a particular time of day.

If you would like to participate you have until next Saturday midnight to post a photo or write about what is happening in your part of the world between 15:00 – 16:00 this week.  I hope you’ll join in! See links for more details.