Day Twenty-Four

The theme for Becky’s  April Squares challenge is ‘top’ 

    1. On Top of the World – summit, crown, peak or uppermost part of something
    2. Under the Big Top – topping or covering (or if you’re really lucky circus)
    3. Room at the Top – first or highest in position
    4. Cherry on Top – something made even more wonderful by becoming square
    5. Top and Tail – or maybe you’d prefer to play around with word combinations such as top dog, top stitch, top full, top line, top fruit, top hat, top secret, top knot, top drawer and top dollar!
Cherry on Top “Boo”

An old photo of my daughter-in-law with baby Lorenzo (who turns six today) chicken watching in her mother’s garden in Raglan, New Zealand and watched over by the wonderful realistic scarecrow. And for those of you with keen eyes you will have spotted the veggies under cover to protect them from the chickens.

April Squares | Day Twenty-four

Seeing Red

the National Museum of Australia, Canberra

This photo was taken of my son and eldest granddaughter just over five years ago when I visited her home town of Canberra. We spent the day visiting several of the capital city’s many free museums and galleries of which this was a favourite of mine. I found it particularly amusing that Miki was wearing a T-shirt with the logo “Offspring” on it. And had red hair at the time!

(This could also be a bonus square for Becky – Slatted-light or filtered-light be OK?)

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #81 | Red

Call to Place : India

In the beginning…

My grandfather, Herbert Beddall was born in Sheffield in 1889. He lived in Dunsville near Doncaster and worked as a blacksmith. He married Annie George in April 1908 when he was only 19 years old; Annie was 24 and they were cousins. My grandfather suffered from ill health and the cold damp winters in the north of England did not help, so in 1913 he and his wife and baby son got on a boat at Liverpool docks and went to India where he worked as a silversmith and gunsmith. In 1916 he returned to England where a daughter was born, my aunt Marjorie, but it wasn’t long before he returned to India and his youngest child, (another daughter, my mother Iris) was born in 1919. When she was born they were living at Angus Jute Mills, Gourhati in the Chandannagore subdivsion part of the Hooghly-Damodar Plain near Calcutta. The Portuguese, the Dutch, the French, the Danes and the British dominated industry, trade and commerce in this area for more than two centuries.

Herbert Beddall – definitely not in India!

Eventually the family returned to England and settled back in Thorne near Doncaster, South Yorkshire. My grandfather died of a heart attack whilst cycling to work in March 1938, aged just 49. My mother was only 18 years old.

As a child I always romanticised about living abroad. It seemed such an exciting thing to do; I adored learning about explorers who went out into the unknown and discovered unknown lands and reading about the settlers. I thought my grandfather must have been very adventurous and wished he had lived long enough for me to have known him. As it was my mother’s vague childhood remembrances of India had to do. Her tales of the “Amah” sleeping outside the bedroom she and her sister shared in order to protect them from any intruders was completely alien to our very English suburban way of life.

Because of this background, India in particular appeared very exotic and greatly appealed to me; I didn’t need too many excuses to want to go there, but it seemed no-one else in my family was keen.

The inspiration for my particular travels came from the ‘hippies’ of the 1960s heading to mystical India to seek spiritualism and so-called enlightenment. One of the key elements was travelling as cheaply as possible for as long as possible, using buses, trains and hitch-hiking their way as far as possible from the ‘evils’ of Western capitalism.

It wasn’t until 1973 when I turned twenty years old that my own overland adventure began following that famous ‘Hippie Trail’ through Europe, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan. It was a journey that would shape my life.

~wander.essence~ Call to Place

Time x Square

Time is quickly running out for December squares hosted by the lovely Becky. The photos don’t necessarily have to be of a timepiece, but are open to interpretation to reflect time in some way, or sayings such as ‘the passing of time’, ‘a stitch in time’, or ‘time running away from you’.

Day 28  Going Back in Time

My two older brothers and I back in the 1950s when boys were dressed in the same style of clothes as the adults. This must have been a special occasion and most likely the photograph was by a professional. I was about 21 months then and obviously my attention was not focused on the photographer!

To join in with the Squares challenge please visit Becky for instructions. Remember the only proper rule is that the photo must be SQUARE.

December Squares | Day Twenty-eight

Weekly Photo Challenge: “We are Family”

THIS WEEK, IN A POST CREATED SPECIFICALLY FOR THIS CHALLENGE, SHARE A PHOTO SHOWING FAMILY.

elephant family 3
After the Storm

If you would like to see what others have come up with for this challenge then go to the Daily Post @ WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge 

At the Waterhole - Addo
At the Waterhole – Addo

Well, I don’t like posting family photos publicly, and this is essentially a travel blog after all, so my family photos are of my favourite wild animal, Elephants. We all know from the many wildlife programs that they display complex social and emotional behaviour and are said to value their families more than most animals.

elephant family 4
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