Planes, Trains and Automobiles…

In 2005 we decided on a trip to Canada, starting with a flight to Toronto, a train to Vancouver and a ferry over to the Island where we hired a car to get around to some amazing places. So join me on my Canadian trip of a lifetime.

Air:  The following images are taken on coming in to land at Toronto as we circled right over the city. Sometimes even having a seat with a wing view can be interesting too.

Train: After a few days exploring Toronto and a quick trip down to Niagara Falls we joined the Canadian train departing from Union Station in the country’s largest city to cross through some of Canada’s most sparsely populated regions. On the first day the panorama changes from the glass skyscrapers of Toronto to the pine trees of Sioux Lookout. Day two took us to Edmonton, crossing Winnipeg River, the Prairies and the lakes of Whiteshell Provincial Park. On the third day the train steadily climbs through the foothills of the Rockies, crossing several rivers and glacial lakes of the most stunning colours. After Jasper the train winds its way through the Yellowhead Pass, the crest of which marks the border of Alberta and British Columbia. The Canadian is in sight of Mount Robson for 16 km before turning sharply south and descending. In the early hours of the morning the mountains suddenly fall away and the Canadian follows the flat green fields along the Fraser River. It arrives at the Pacific Railway Station in Vancouver after a long and astonishing journey.

Boat: On reaching Vancouver the next step of our journey was to travel on the wonderful BC Ferries up and along the Sunshine Coast then over to Vancouver Island. I’m not a very good sailor, but would go on these ferries any time, and if you are lucky, as we were, you might catch a glimpse of a pod or two of Orcas.

Of course there are many other types of boats on Vancouver Island, so here are a few of the smaller ones.

Road: Of course the journey would not be complete without the use of our lovely Lincoln hire car. She enabled us to get off the highways and to more remote places that were not easily accessible by public transport. On and off ferries to explore the smaller islands of Hornby and Denman, over a logging route to visit Telegraph Cove, along the Pacific Rim coastline to Port Renfrew, Ucluelet and Tofino, and north to Alert Bay. But my first journeys in the car were in the environs of Vancouver – to the fabulous UBC Anthropology Museum, Van Dusen Gardens and over the Lions Gate Bridge to Grouse Mountain.

And of course there are many other methods of transport available in Canada. I hope you have enjoyed the ride 🙂

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #215 |Planes, Trains and Automobiles

Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

The last of my transport posts, this month features this lovely iconic bus from Gozo as well as my last historic streetcar from San Francisco.

You can find more information about Maltese buses here.

Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas 1056, built in 1948. This car is painted in tribute to Kansas City, which ran PCC streetcars from 1941 to 1957. Kansas City’s PCCs – 184 in all – were painted to emphasize their modern lines, with a black ‘swoosh’ on the sides to highlight the logo of Kansas City Public Service Company (KCPS), which featured Frederic Remington’s famed sculpture “The Scout” on a red heart.

If you want to learn more about San Francisco’s historic streetcars and cable cars then please visit the Market Street Railway Museum.

DO YOU HAVE ANY Black or Grey TRANSPORTATION?

 

Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

This week I am going to look at transport, including another of those wonderful streetcars from San Francisco. But we’ll begin with this lovely traditional Maltese bus.  The old Malta buses were really something truly unique and one of the most recognisable icons of Malta. The last of these old Maltese buses were yellow in colour with an orange horizontal stripe and their Gozitan counterparts grey coloured with a red horizontal stripe. The vast majority of the buses started and ended their trips at the main terminus in Valletta with a few operating on circular routes. Sadly these were phased out in 2011.

A Maltese Bus

Milan, Italy 1856, built in 1928 and still operational. The second most common type of streetcar in Muni’s historic fleet is an American classic with an Italian accent. This type of car is named for Cleveland street railway commissioner Peter Witt, who designed it for his Ohio city around 1915. The concept was to speed loading by putting the conductor in the middle of the car, letting crowds board through the front door and paying as they passed the conductor. The design was also exported to world cities such as Toronto, Mexico City, Madrid, and three Italian cities, Naples, Turin, and Milan where they still operate today.

(In the 1970s, the Milan tram fleet was repainted a solid orange, the livery worn by the remainder of Muni’s Milan trams)

If you want to learn more about San Francisco’s historic streetcars and cable cars then please visit the Market Street Railway Museum.

Do you have any orange Transport?

Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

This week I am going to look at San Francisco Streetcars. Red ones naturally.

Birmingham, Alabama, PCC Car, 1077, built in 1947. This car’s exterior commemorates Birmingham, Alabama, which operated PCC streetcars from 1947 to 1953. When streetcars were a new technology, around the turn of the 20th Century, it was common for systems to be owned by the local electric utility.


Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Co. PCC Car, 1007, built in 1948. This car commemorates Philadelphia Suburban Transportation Co. (PST)–the ‘Red Arrow’ lines serving Philly’s western suburbs–which ran interurban cars with some PCC features from 1949 to 1982.

If you want to learn more about San Francisco’s historic streetcars and cable cars then please visit the Market Street Railway Museum.

Do you have any red transportation?

Life in Colour

To find out more about this year’s photo challenge here on Travel Words, please read this post.

We are back in San Francisco this week with a another look at the Historic Streetcars, this time in blue.

San Francisco Municipal Railway (1940s), No.130, built in 1914, is currently awaiting restoration after 102 years of service with the original wiring. Car No. 130 was among the the last ‘Iron Monsters’ to leave passenger service. In 1958. Muni shop foreman Charlie Smallwood saved it from the scrap heap by hiding it in the back of Geneva carhouse while its mates met their fates.

Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company, No.1060, built in 1947. This streetcar is an actual Philadelphia streetcar painted in that city’s original PCC livery, dating from 1938, of silver with cream window area and electric blue striping. The similarity to the packaging of Kraft’s famous ‘Philadelphia Cream Cheese’ did not go unnoticed, providing the car a nickname — the Cream Cheese Car.

San Francisco Municipal Railway (1940s), No.1010, built 1948. This car is painted in tribute to the ‘Magic Carpets’, as Muni’s first five modern-design streetcars were known.

If you want to learn more about San Francisco’s historic streetcars and cable cars then please visit the Market Street Railway Museum.

Can you find any blue transport?